Tuesday, March 31, 2009

MAXCLUSIVE! Red Sea Max $599.99 w/ Free Shipping


In honor of the Marine Aquarium Expo this weekend, we've put together this sweet deal for the silver 34-gallon Red Sea Max, which includes the tank, stand and the amenities shown here ... all for only $599.99. And we'll ship it to you for free.

Tech Specs

  • Total system volume: 130 liters (34 gallons)
  • Aquarium volume: 110 liters (29 gallons)
  • Filter volume: 20 liters (5 gallons)
  • Aquarium length: 610 mm (24")
  • Aquarium width: 500 mm (19.7")
  • Aquarium height: 500 mm (19.7")
  • Total height: 612 mm (24.1")
  • Glass thickness: 8 mm (5/16")
  • 5 outlet power center
  • Course mechanical media
  • Fine mechanical media
  • Skimmer volume: 3.8 liters (1 gallon)
  • Skimmer pump: 1,200 lph (320 gph)
  • Collection cup volume: 1.5 liters (0.4 gallon)
  • Circulation pumps: 2 x 550 lph (2 x 145 gph)
  • Ceramic bio-media: 2 liters (0.5 gallon)
  • Activated carbon: 200 g (7 oz)
  • Fan cooled hood
  • Lighting—10,000K: 55W
  • Lighting—Actinic: 55W
  • Electronic ballast
  • LED moonlights
  • 24 hour programmable timer
  • Thermostat heater: 150W

Monday, March 30, 2009

Join us at the Marine Aquarium Expo

Do you have weekend plans? If so, cancel them ... we have something much more fun in mind.

Come visit our booth at the Marine Aquarium Expo this Saturday and Sunday at the OC Fair & Event Center and pick up a catalog along with some exclusive event coupons for our online store.

If you didn't attend last year or are unfamiliar, the
Marine Aquarium Expo (MAX) is the largest consumer event in North America for the marine aquarium hobby. MAX brings together saltwater enthusiasts for an entire weekend of selling, trading and showcasing the latest products and livestock.

More than 100 exhibit booths will fill the 30,000 square foot floor space along with an adjacent courtyard where 6 speakers, 2 huge drawings, 10 club booths and a large 8' children's touch tank will reside. Even the
Long Beach Aquarium of the Pacific will have an exhibit this year! The cost of admission price is only $10 for adults and $5 for seniors. Children 12 and under are FREE.

Other event highlights will include the opportunity to mingle with other hobbyists, vendors and seeing the latest releases from popular brands like EcoTech Marine and Digital Aquatics. Most local hobbyists know that MAX showcases some of the best coral retailers in Southern California and you'll undoubtedly come away with some fantastic frags for fabulous prices.

For more information, visit the official
MAX website.

We hope to see you there!

Marine Aquarium Expo
April 4-5 - 12 noon till 6 PM
OC Fair & Event Center (enter from Arlington drive, gate #8)
88 Fair Drive
Costa Mesa, CA 92626

Deal of the Week


JBJ In-Tank Submariner UV Sterilizer/Clarifier

5 Watt
Regularly
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Sale Price $68.99

9 Watt
Regularly
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Sale Price $83.99

~ YOU SAVE $10! ~

Sunday, March 29, 2009

Lobsters and crabs feel pain, study shows

Ripping the legs off live crabs and crowding lobsters into seafood market tanks are just two of the many practices that may warrant reassessment, given two new studies that indicate crustaceans feel pain and stress.

The findings add to a growing body of evidence that virtually all animals, including fish, shellfish and insects, can suffer.

Robert Elwood, the lead author of both papers, explained to Discovery News that pain allows an individual to be "aware of the potential tissue damage" while experiencing "a huge negative emotion or motivation that it learns to avoid that situation in the future."

Both pain and stress are therefore key survival mechanisms.

Elwood, a professor in the School of Biological Sciences at The Queen's University in Belfast, and colleague Mirjam Appel studied hermit crabs collected from rock pools in County Down, Northern Ireland. All of the crabs survived the experiments and were later released back into their native habitat.

Elwood and Appel gave small electric shocks to some of the crabs within their shells. When the researchers provided vacant shells, some crabs — but only the ones that had been shocked —left their old shells and entered the new ones, showing stress-related behaviors like grooming of the abdomen or rapping of the abdomen against the empty shell.

Grooming, as for a person licking a burnt finger, "is a protective motor reaction and viewed as a sign of pain in vertebrates," the researchers wrote.

It has been thought that the behavior of crustaceans is mostly reflexive, but the fact that they showed signs of physical distress at the same time they changed a behavior — in this case, moving into another shell — suggest they feel pain as well, according to the researchers.

The research has been accepted for publication in the journal Animal Behavior.

For the second paper, slated for publication in the journal Applied Animal Behavior Science, Elwood, along with Stuart Barr and Lynsey Patterson, outline seven reasons, with supportive findings, they believe crustaceans suffer.

For one thing, they argue, crustaceans possess "a suitable central nervous system and receptors." They learn to avoid a negative stimulus after a potentially painful experience. They also engage in protective reactions, such as limping and rubbing, after being hurt.

Physiological changes, including release of adrenal-like hormones, also occur when pain or stress is suspected. And the animals make future decisions based on past likely painful events.

If crabs are given medicine — anesthetics or analgesics — they appear to feel relieved, showing fewer responses to negative stimuli. And finally, the researchers wrote, crustaceans possess "high cognitive ability and sentience."

In the past, some scientists reasoned that since pain and stress are associated with the neocortex in humans, all creatures must have this brain structure in order to experience such feelings. More recent studies, however, suggest that crustacean brains and nervous systems are configured differently. For example, fish, lobsters and octopi all have vision, Elwood said, despite lacking a visual cortex, which allows humans to see.

It was also thought that since many invertebrates cast off damaged appendages, it was not harmful for humans to remove legs, tails and other body parts from live crustaceans. Another study led by Patterson, however, found that when humans twisted off legs from crabs, the stress response was so profound that some individuals later died or could not regenerate the lost appendages.

Chris Sherwin, a senior research fellow in the Clinical Veterinary Science division at the University of Bristol, has also studied pain in invertebrates.

Sherwin told Discovery News, "The question of whether invertebrates experience pain is fundamental to our legislation that protects animals and our behavior, attitude and use of these highly complex organisms."

He said that while the recent studies suggest crustaceans experience "something akin to pain, rather than fixed, reflex responses," additional research is needed.

SOURCE (image and article): MSNBC

Friday, March 27, 2009

Turn off Your Lights to Save Coral Reefs!



It appears Eric at
glassbox-design.com beat me to the punch on this one. But that's OK ... the more promotion, the better. I just always figure that if you're reading our blog, you're probably reading the other blogs in our blogroll and, IMHO, glassbox is one of the best.

Anyway, to the the point of this post.


You may have already caught commercials on TV advertising
Earth Hour, but it wasn't until I received an email yesterday from the Coral Life Alliance that this event really hit home for me. I've pasted their letter below ... please give it a read and consider taking part if you can. MarineDepot.com will be!

Climate change is the number one threat to our precious coral reefs. On Saturday, March 28, 2009, at 8:30 pm, tens of millions of people throughout the world will turn out their lights to make a statement of concern about the future of our planet as part of Earth Hour.

The Coral Reef Alliance (CORAL) has pledged to support Earth Hour and is inviting all of our members to take part in this historic and inspiring event.


Earth Hour got its start just two years ago and is now the largest event of its kind in the world. Last year, more than 50 million people participated and the lights went out at the Empire State Building, the Golden Gate Bridge, the Sydney Opera House, and the Coliseum in Rome, just to name a few. Even Google's homepage went black for the day!


This year, Earth Hour will be even bigger—nearly 2,000 cities in more than 80 countries have agreed to take part including Atlanta, Chicago, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, Miami, and Nashville with more signing up every day. Around the world cities like Moscow, Hong Kong, Mumbai, Shanghai, and Mexico City are among the many cities that will turn out their lights. But Earth Hour isn't just for big cities—anyone can participate. To get a better sense of the power of this event, please take a few minutes to view a video of
Earth Hour 2008.

Participating in Earth Hour is easy, fun, and free. It's also a wonderful opportunity for friends and families to gather together and think about the issues confronting our planet and the ways that we can work together to make a positive difference. Please join us in taking part in this inspiring event. To sign up, visit
www.coral.org.

We want the United States to turn out more lights than any other country in the world during this historic event so please pass this note along to anyone you think might want to take part. Let's all turn out and take action on March 28 at 8:30 pm.

Q&A with Keith, 3/27/09


QUESTION

About 2 months ago I was having issues with my Red Sea Max. I was getting a lot of red slime on my sand. I went to my LFS and he said taking the sand out and running the system with no sand would be the best thing to do. Since then I have had nothing but problems. Does live sand "go bad?" What do you recommend?

ANSWER

Red slime (cyanobacteria) can occur in aquariums with or without live sand, so I do not think that was the route of the problem.

Red slime commonly occurs in tanks that lack adequate water flow (many Red Sea Max and nano tank owners add an extra powerhead to thwart this problem), have high nutrient levels (phosphates and nitrates in particular) or have old bulbs and the color spectrum has shifted (learn how often to replace your bulbs here). It may be any one of these issues causing your problem or even a combination of some or all of them.

So what can you do to stop cyanobacteria from taking over your tank?

First, address the aforementioned problems and that should make a big difference. Remember to increase water flow, do not overfeed, perform regular water changes every 1-4 weeks using a high-quality salt mix with filtered water (preferably RO or RO/DI) and remember to change your bulbs at appropriate (regular) intervals.

During your water changes, try to siphon out as much of the red slime as possible. Some hobbyists will turn off their lights for a few days to slow the growth of the slime while working to rid their tank of it.

There are also medications that kill red slime, but in my humble opinion, these should only used as a last resort. If the underlying issues causing the red slime are not addressed, red slime medications will likely only fix the problem temporarily.

To address your "does live sand go bad?" question: this answer is a bit complicated. If you were to leave the sand stagnate in a bucket of saltwater, then yes, it would indeed go bad.

Live sand needs water movement to help it stay "alive." The critters living in the sand need the oxygen in moving water to stay alive. The sand itself doesn't need to be moving, only the water flowing around the tank to help with gas exchange.

Now, the more complicated part: the critters in your live sand may change or deplete over the months and years your tank is in operation. This may be due to lack of food, predation by other organisms, siphoning or other circumstances.

Many experienced hobbyists recommend adding a little live sand every so often (up to a few times each year) to help keep a diverse population within the sand bed. Some aquarium clubs even hold "sand swaps," where members bring in a Ziploc bag full of sand, mix them all together in a bucket and then everyone goes home with a "new" bag of live sand to add to their aquarium. You may even be able to find a LFS that sells a live sand "booster kit" that will contain more organisms for your sand.

Hopefully this has helped answer some of your questions. If there is anything more we can do to assist you, please let us know.

-------------------------------------------------
If you would like to ask Keith a question,
click here.

Thursday, March 26, 2009

MarineDepot.com Teams with Cell Phones for Soldiers to Help Troops Stay Connected with Families

Cell Phones for Soldiers was founded by Norwell, MA teenagers Robbie and Brittany Bergquist with $21 of their own money. Since then, the registered 501c3 non-profit organization has raised almost $1 million in donations and distributed more than 500,000 prepaid calling cards to soldiers serving overseas.

During the month of April, we will include 4,000 pre-paid Cell Phones for Soldiers envelopes inside packages shipped to our customers.


The donated phones are sent to
ReCellular, who pays Cell Phones for Soldiers for each phone – enough to provide an hour of talk time to soldiers abroad.

Approximately half of the phones ReCellular processes are reconditioned and resold to wholesale companies in over 40 countries around the world. Phones and components that cannot be refurbished are dismantled and recycled to reclaim materials.


So regardless of your motive–helping soldiers and their families, saving the earth or just getting ride of an old, unwanted phone–we hope you'll help out. :-)

Tuesday, March 24, 2009

Big Kahuna Reef Game for Free! (Limited-Time Offer?)

Who wants a free game?

I do!

Who wants to kill a few hours of freetime?


I know you do!


I have yet to try out this game, but according to reviews like this one on
Amazon:

Great game, but screensaver is the real
deal
I bought this after playing the demo.... ...The game is simple and easy to pickup. Unique puzzle shapes and "locked" cells add
some challenge to the typical match-3 style game play.

It may be worth a download.

Monday, March 23, 2009

Tonga Undersea Volcano Erupts



A volcanic eruption close to the South Pacific nation of Tonga has destroyed rich birdlife and vegetation, leaving a wasteland of black ash and tree stumps, witnesses said Friday.

Sightseers, officials and scientists who have taken boats to the site have described frequent explosions hurtling rocks and ash hundreds of metres into the air.

The volcano, on the small, uninhabited islet of Hunga Ha'apai 63 kilometres (39 miles) northwest of the Tongan capital Nuku'alofa, began erupting Monday, several days after a moderate earthquake.

It continued to spew Friday even as a major earthquake with a magnitude of 7.9 rocked Tonga's main island of Tongatapu.

The volcano is hundreds of kilometres from the epicentre of the earthquake, which caused no significant damage but sparked a regional tsunami warning.

Radio journalist George Lavaka, who visited the island with a sightseeing group Thursday, said the explosions were accompanied by a deep rumbling.

"The island itself is totally destroyed," Lavaka said, "there is no living thing left there, it's all covered in black ash.

"There are only black stumps where the coconut trees were," he added. "We saw dead birds and fish in the water."

Tonga's chief geologist Kelepi Mafi, who inspected the area Thursday, said the volcano has two vents, one on Hunga Ha'apai and another around 100 metres offshore.

The volume of the rock and ash coming from the vents has completely filled the gap between the offshore vent and Hunga Ha'apai, increasing the island's land mass by hundreds of square metres.

Tonga, which lies almost 2,000 kilometres northeast of New Zealand, lies on the so-called Pacific "Ring of Fire", where continental plates collide causing frequent volcanic and seismic activity.

Lavaka's boat managed to get out of harm's way when the explosive power of the eruptions suddenly surged.

"We were close to the island and there was huge explosion and the smoke was coming toward us, and people were yelling "start the boat, start the boat," he said.

"The smoke stopped about 30 metres short of the boat, we were a bit shaken actually."

Soon after the boat moved further away from the island, the area they had been in was enveloped in poisonous smoke.

A local airline was reportedly planning to fly sightseers near the eruption site Friday.

Mafi said the government was warning the curious to stay away.

"It's very interesting, but it's very risky also," he said, adding that -- given the strength of the explosions -- the eruption could continue until the end of the weekend.

The eruption is not expected to affect residents on Tongatapu.

Residents at Tongatapu's western end reported seeing the orange glow of the eruption Thursday night, with bright white sparks flying in the air.

Friday's quake, which struck shortly after dawn, was centred 210 kilometres south-southeast of Nuku'alofa, the US Geological Survey said.

SOURCE 1: Google News (Article & Image)
SOURCE 2: Associated Press (Video)

Deal of the Week


250 Watt 14000K Metal Halide Bulb - Phoenix, Mogul Base

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Sales Price $89.99

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Friday, March 20, 2009

Q&A with Keith, 3/20/09


QUESTION
I have a 37-gallon tank I just started. It currently has live sand and 30 lbs of live rock. The only livestock in it is a Stars and Stripe Puffer. It seems pretty aggressive. I would like to add some live corals and invertebrates. Is it possible with the puffer? If so, I would appreciate any recommendations.


ANSWER

I always hate being the bearer of bad news, but I have two bad things to tell you.

First, your tank is way too small for a Stars and Stripe Puffer fish (Arothron hispidus). These puffer fish can grow to almost 19 inches and ideally should be in an aquarium of at least 100 gallons.

The second bad thing is they are not considered a reef safe fish. Puffers tend to "taste" everything. It will most likely kill off any invertebrates you try to put in the tank.
If your goal is to have a reef tank with corals and other invertebrates, I would suggest trading the puffer fish in at a local fish store and going with fish that are

a) suitable for 37-gallon tank (stay away from tangs, for example) and
b) are reef safe fish.
If you are unsure which fish are suitable for your tank size (and that are also reef safe), try A Pocket Expert Guide to Reef Aquarium Fishes by Scott W. Michael. The book covers many different fish that can thrive in your tank along with information on hardiness.

If there is anything else we can do for you please let us know.



--------------------
----------------------------------
If you would like to ask Keith a question,
click here.

Aquarium Apps for iPhone and iPod Touch


Invertebrate Pocket Reference is a guide for marine aquarists available for download through the iTunes App Store and is compatible with the iPhone and iPod touch.

According to the description, the application will help you determine if an animal you are considering purchasing or collecting is suitable for a saltwater or reef aquarium.

The application includes the Latin name of the animal, its size, diet, behavior, lighting requirements, whether it is reef-friendly, venomous and more.

This is the second iPhone/iPod Touch application for aquarium hobbyists developed by zMac Consulting, LLC. The first, Aquarium Abbreviations, become available last month.

For more information, visit iTunes or click on the image accompanying this post. The Aquarium Abbreviations app is available for free and the Invertebrate Pocket Reference is $1.99. As of today, there is a single 5-star review for each application.

If anyone downloads these applications, please leave us a comment and let us know how they are. My stinkin' G1 doesn't have these apps available in the Andriod Market.

Go ahead, rub it in iPhone users. :-P

UPDATE: ReefBuilders posted about an aquarium-related iPhone app yesterday from Seachem that is available in the iTunes app store for free! If you know of anymore, please leave us a comment.

Thursday, March 19, 2009

Giant worm found in Blue Reef Aquarium

Aquarists at the Blue Reef Aquarium in Newquay have discovered the identity of a mysterious killer that had been devastating their coral reef display over recent months.

Staff had been puzzled by violent attacks on their fragile living reefs – in some cases the corals had been literally cut in half.

After staking out the display for several weeks, aquarists decided as a last resort to take it apart rock by rock.

Halfway through the process the terrifying perpetrator was finally revealed - a monstrous four-foot-long giant reef worm.

Staff eventually lured it out with fish scraps – but not before it bit through 20lb fishing line.

Curator Matt Slater said: “As part of our tropical marine displays we have been painstakingly propagating a variety of corals. They are extremely slow-growing and every one we have lost to these attacks was a major blow.

“In the end it got so bad that I decided to literally take the display apart to find out who was responsible. I could hardly believe my eyes when I finally caught sight of the culprit.

“It really does look like something out of a horror movie! It’s over four feet long with these bizarre-looking jaws. Having done some research we also discovered that it is covered with thousands of bristles which are capable of inflicting a sting resulting in permanent numbness'.”

Matt believes it probably arrived as a juvenile in a delivery of living rock from another aquarium.

After being carefully removed the worm – which has been nicknamed ‘Barry’ by staff – has been re-located into its own tank, safely away from the coral.

“Obviously we’re reluctant to feed it on any more of our living coral so we are currently looking at alternatives. Some references suggest it may also feed on seaweed so we’ll try it on that in the short term,” added Matt.

SOURCE (article and image): thisisthewestcountry.co.uk

Wednesday, March 18, 2009

The Writing is on the Wall ... err, Fish



My boss saw this today at a LFS. Sad, right?

We do not think this is cool. You?

'Predator X', more fearsome than than the T. Rex, terrorized the seas 147 million years ago


It was 50-feet long, weighed 45 tons and brandished jaws that would make the meanest Great White shark look like a guppy.

An international team of paleontologists Monday unveiled the partial skull of "Predator X", a recently discovered species of pliosaur, which ruled the seas 147 million years ago.

The prehistoric predator terrorized its prey with "the most powerful bite ever recorded in any fossil or any living creature," Dr. Jørn Hurum, the team leader, told the Daily News by phone from Oslo.

Consulting an expert on alligators at Florida State University, Hurum's team calculated that the dinosaur's jaws packed a bite with 33,000 pounds of force - four times that of the Tyranosaurus Rex.

"We've got really a bad animal here," Hurum said. "It's like putting a turbo gear on the biggest Great White in the ecosystem."

The find, called the "jewel in the crown for paleontologists," was made on the Arctic archipelago of Svalbard in northern Norway. Hurum said that's an area so cold that the 11-person team can only dig three to four weeks a year in the summer.

The skull was unearthed last July, but not made public until Monday.

The History Channel will be spotlighting the discovery on a documentary, "Predator X," airing March 29.

"When this thing lived...modern sharks were just beginning to evolve," said Steve Brusatte, a fossil/reptile researcher at the American Museum of Natural History. "So this thing and it's relatives filled that niche in the ocean - that giant predator at the top of the food chain."

Deadliest Catch Captain to be Featured on BlueZoo Radio

We've talked about BlueZoo Radio, a show dedicated to the aquarium hobby, on our blog in the past.

It look like their program content is expanding...


...BlueZoo host Frank contacted us this morning to let us know they have some cool guests lined up for the April 13 episode so we thought we'd pass the word along.


Captain of the
Cornelia Marie and one of the stars of Discovery's Deadliest Catch, Phil Harris, along with two of his sons (and ship deckhands) will be talking to the BlueZoo crew about what I can only presume to be their experiences crabbing on the Bering Sea (correct me if I'm wrong, Frank). LOL

We'll be listening.
Will you?

Monday, March 16, 2009

New this Week, 3/16/09


San Francisco Bay Brand Freeze Dried Krill 1oz (28g) Jar
Excellent for your large freshwater and marine tropicals. Contains astaxanthin, a carotenoid that brings out the color of your fish. High in essential fatty and amino acids. Recommended for all freshwater Cichlids, Loaches, Eels and Catfish as well as all saltwater Groupers & Eels. Ingredients: Krill.



Deep Sea Aquatics 34 Gallon NEO Aquarium, Glass Sump & Black Cabinet Stand
Introducing the Neo Nano from Deep Sea Aquatics! A truly unique aquarium that allows you – the hobbyist – to create th
e environment best suited for your choice of inhabitants! Unprecedented viewing opportunities combined with our innovative new “Cascade” filtration technology moves volumes of water while maintaining a relatively smooth water surface for the ultimate viewing experience!

JBJ 24 Gallon Nano Cube 150W HQI Aquarium Canopy Upgrade Kit
Let there be light! Be the first upgrade your 24g Nano Cube Deluxe (Model: MT-50-LED) into our new 28g HQI canopy. The first HQI metal halide system integrated into the canopy to keep the aesthetic appeal with the high powered lighting that is required for SPS, CLAMS, and LSP species.



1/12HP TECO SeaChill Chiller TR5
The best selling chiller in Europe is now available in North America! The versatile SeaChill features refrigeration, heating an
d optional UV Sterilization in one extremely quiet compact and reliable unit! Backed by the best warranty in the industry; a full two years. SeaChill chillers use a patented high efficiency Titanium heat exchanger to decrease electrical consumption by over 30%. Comes with a digital controller, quick-clean air filter, no-drip fast disconnect valves for hassle free installation. Unique silent mode makes the SeaChill the quietest chiller available.

400W TECO Small Heater for SeaChill TR5
Easy to install heater kit. Installation takes no more than ten
minutes. The kit comes with a 400 watt heater custom designed for the TECO SeaChill TR5 aquarium chiller. No tools are required for installation, but channel lock pliers (or similar) may make installation easier. Note: This item is for TR-5 chiller only.



Current USA Cardiff 24gal Aquarium w/ PC 55W 10000K Daylight/460nm 2C Pendant & Modern Stand
Create the ultimate conversation piece. Designed with professionally beveled glass, the unique shape is bent to enhance the view from all angles and creates an eye-catching addition to your home or office. A completely hidden filtration system makes keeping fish easy - and keeps your critters and family happy.


AquaticLife pH Controller/ ORP Monitor
A pH controller and ORP monitor incorporated into a single housing. The dual display shows both pH and ORP levels m
easured by the probes. The pH controller display is shown in blue and the ORP level is shown in red. A pH regulating device can be powered by the single grounded outlet incorporated into the controller. Both probes use standard BNC connections and include adjustable holders. The housing is designed to be free-standing or wall mounted with the included hardware. A protective front cover is reversible and can open either left or right depending on the mounting requirement.

AquaticLife pH Controller/ pH Monitor
A pH controller and pH monitor incorporated into a single housing. The dual display shows both pH levels measured by t
he probes. The pH controller display is shown in blue and the pH moniter is shown in red. A pH regulating device can be powered by the single grounded outlet incorporated into the controller. Both probes use standard BNC connections and include adjustable holders. The housing is designed to be free-standing or wall mounted with the included hardware. A protective front cover is reversible and can open either left or right depending on the mounting requirement.

ELOS 20 Gallon System Mini Aquarium & Cabinet Stand w/ Silver Door (e-Lite Not Included)
Introducing the newest addition to ELOS aquarium systems,
the ELOS System MINI. Built with the same uncompromising attention to detail that has made ELOS aquarium systems world renowned. For the first time aquarium lovers seeking a small complete system can have a system designed and built to the highest standards. The beautiful ELOS SQUARE cabinet holds our ELOS SUMP , with built in freshwater reservoir (top off controller not included), includes quiet and efficient Eheim pumps and our patented NS100, specifically designed for the System MINI. The ELOS System MINI is completely designed and made in Italy.

ELOS 20 Gallon System Mini Aquarium, Cabinet Stand w/ Wenge Door & Silver e-Lite LED Fixture
Introducing the newest addition to ELOS aquarium systems, th
e ELOS System MINI. Built with the same uncompromising attention to detail that has made ELOS aquarium systems world renowned. For the first time aquarium lovers seeking a small complete system can have a system designed and built to the highest standards. The new LED e-Lite offers a sleek and powerful light that perfectly complements the ELOS pool using our unique ELOS overflow, crystal clear front pane constructed with our specially blended adhesive for a strong and elegant aquarium. The beautiful ELOS SQUARE cabinet holds our ELOS SUMP , with built in freshwater reservoir (top off controller not included), includes quiet and efficient Eheim pumps and our patented NS100, specifically designed for the System MINI. The ELOS System MINI is completely designed and made in Italy.

Sunday, March 15, 2009

Deal of the Week


SCWD (Switching Current Water Director, "Squid") 1-Inch Wavemaker

Regularly
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Sale Price $69.99


YOU SAVE $20 - OVER 22%!


Learn More...

Wednesday, March 11, 2009

Pet store expects fish shipment, but gets corpse

Employees of a Philadelphia pet store expecting to get a shipment of tropical fish and salt water by air cargo ended up getting a human body instead. Mark Arabia owns the Pets Plus store in Northeast Philadelphia where the mix-up was discovered Tuesday.

He said he eventually learned that the body he got was that of a 65-year-old San Diego-area man who died of early onset Alzheimer's Disease. The body was supposed to go to a laboratory in Allentown so samples could be taken for medical research.

US Airways released a statement saying the problem was caused by a "verbal miscommunication between a delivery driver and the cargo representative." The airline said it's deeply sorry.


Arabia said he believes the fish died as a result.


SOURCE:
Associated Press, Google News

Tuesday, March 10, 2009

Aquarium Blog of the Day: frag'd it

We've been following frag'd it for a while now and you should be, too.

Of course we like a little
humor in our hobby news, but frag'd it does a fantastic job balancing fun with useful information, news and plenty of colorful commentary.

Speaking of commentary, read
"The Name Game Gone Berserk" from a week ago. This one really caught our eye. Oh, and check out PFE, too.

If you're new to the aquarium blogosphere and arrived here through our
newsletter, we've linked to our favorite aquarium blogs below in the right column. The newest posts show up on our site as they are updated so you can click through to see what's new.

Monday, March 09, 2009

New this Week, 3/9/09


Aquarium Systems Premium Maxi-Jet 4500 & 5500
New high-efficiency, flow adjustable Marine Series pumps meet the most demanding requirements of saltwater and freshwater systems. Engineered to handle the capacities of our new Deep Dimension Corner-Flo Aquariums and our new High-Capacity Acrylic Sump Filtration Systems. They’re also more than a match for other brands of aquariums and sumps.



AquaMaxx LED Flat Moonlight
Super bright 1W 455nm Blue LED. Mimics nocturnal reef lighting conditions. Creates a shimmering moonlight effect. Promotes lunar spawning cycles. Mounts easily by two screws. Measures 2" x 2" x 1/4"






AquaticLife Mini pH Meter
Range: 0.00 – 14.00 pH. Resolution: 0.01. Accuracy: +/- 0.1. Operating Temperature: 32o – 122o F / 0o – 50o C. Input V
oltage: AC120 volt 60Hz. Output Voltage: DC5.5 volt 100mA 9 watt.





48" 4x65 Watt AquaticLife PowerCompact CF Light Fixture w/ 4 Lunar LEDs and FREE Mini pH Meter
Designed in a contemporary shape, these Compact Fluorescent fixtures offer new features and light output only available from Aq
uaticLife. Timer controls Compact Fluorescent Lamps and Lunar LED's independently. Like all AquaticLife fixtures, these fixtures use a single power cord to power all lamps, making it easy to mount on the aquarium or suspend from above. Included adjustable width Aquarium Frame Mounts support fixture above the aquarium. Suspension Ports allow connection to optional cables for various mounting configurations. Lateral supports and curvature of the fixture create a durable light housing.

72" 4x96 Watt AquaticLife PowerCompact CF Light Fixture w/ 6 Lunar LEDs and FREE Mini pH Meter
Designed in a contemporary shape, these Compact Fluorescent fixtures offer new features and light output only available from AquaticLife. Timer controls Compact Fluorescent Lamps and Lu
nar LED`s independently. Like all AquaticLife fixtures, these fixtures use a single power cord to power all lamps, making it easy to mount on the aquarium or suspend from above. Included adjustable width Aquarium Frame Mounts support fixture above the aquarium. Suspension Ports allow connection to optional cables for various mounting configurations. Lateral supports and curvature of the fixture create a durable light housing.

Elos E-Lite LED Anodized Silver or Black Aluminum Fixture
Anodized aluminum LED light fixture with power supply available in silver or black. Includes 18 individually reflected lights featuring 80 lumen per watt. Bracket for connecting to
aquarium also included.




Seachem Freshwater and Marine Stability
Stability will rapidly and safely establish the aquarium biofilter in freshwater and marine systems, thereby preventing the #1 cause of fish death: "new tank syndrome". Stability is formulated specifically for the aquarium and contains a
synergistic blend of aerobic, anaerobic, and facultative bacteria which facilitate the breakdown of waste organics, ammonia, nitrite and nitrate. Unlike competing products, the bacteria employed by Stability are non-sulfur fixing and will not produce toxic hydrogen sulfide. Stability is completely harmless to all aquatic organisms as well as aquatic plants, thus there is no danger of over use. Stability is the culmination of nearly a decade of research and development and represents the current state of the art in natural biological management.

Deal of the Week


Aquatic Photographics Seahorses and Their Relatives

Reg Price $69.99

Sale Price $52.49


SAVE 25% / $17.50 with Coupon Code
BOOKWORM

Learn More...

Thursday, March 05, 2009

Under the Sea 3D now playing at IMAX theaters

Director Howard Hall spent over 100 days lugging a 1,300-pound IMAX 3-D camera around the South Seas to film this underwater doc, which offers up dazzling ocean creatures in calmly shifting scenes that could double as the world's most expensive screensaver.

Even Jim Carrey's narration is free of his usual antics; 
he mostly sounds like a science teacher reading a copy of National Geographic Kids to a 
 class of grade-schoolers.

But it's impossible not to be wowed by some of the images in Under the Sea 3D, 
the coolest of which — shimmering cuttlefish and ghostly, spaceship-like jellyfish — are a nice 
reminder that, even in the age of CG wizardry, the best special effects still come straight from Mother Nature.

SOURCE: Entertainment Weekly

Tuesday, March 03, 2009

Pink dolphin appears in US lake

Charter boat captain Erik Rue, 42, photographed the animal, which is actually an albino, when he began studying it after the mammal first surfaced in Lake Calcasieu, an inland saltwater estuary, north of the Gulf of Mexico in southwestern USA.

Capt Rue originally saw the dolphin, which also has reddish eyes, swimming with a pod of four other dolphins, with one appearing to be its mother which never left its side.

He said: "I just happened to see a little pod of dolphins, and I noticed one that was a little lighter.

"It was absolutely stunningly pink.

"I had never seen anything like it. It's the same color throughout the whole body and it looks like it just came out of a paint booth.

"The dolphin appears to be healthy and normal other than its coloration, which is quite beautiful and stunningly pink.

"The mammal is entirely pink from tip to tail and has reddish eyes indicating it's albinism. The skin appears smooth, glossy pink and without flaws.

"I have personally spotted the pink dolphin 40 to 50 times in the time since the original sighting as it has apparently taken up residence with its family in the Calcasieu ship channel.

"As time has passed the young mammal has grown and sometimes ventures away from its mother to feed and play but always remains in the vicinity of the pod.

"Surprisingly, it does not appear to be drastically affected by the environment or sunlight as might be expected considering its condition, although it tends to remain below the surface a little more than the others in the pod."

Regina Asmutis-Silvia, senior biologist with the Whale and Dolphin Conservation Society, said: "I have never seen a dolphin coloured in this way in all my career.

"It is a truly beautiful dolphin but people should be careful, as with any dolphins, to respect it - observe from a distance, limit their time watching, don't chase or harass it

"While this animal looks pink, it is an albino which you can notice in the pink eyes.

"Albinism is a genetic trait and it unclear as to the type of albinism this animal inherited."

A close relation of dolphins, the Amazon River Botos, called pink dolphins, live in South America in the Amazon.

SOURCE: Telegraph.co.uk

Monday, March 02, 2009

New this Week, 3/2/09


Hydor Koralia 5, 6, 7 and 8 Controllable Pumps/Powerheads
The new Koralia models 5-6-7-8 guarantee unbelievable performance for what may be the lowest power consumption of any pump on the market. Equipped with an electronic start up system, new technology rotors, propellers and compact size. Magnums have a pleasant design and come with a powerful magnet-suction cup support that rotates to direct water flow easily. Koralias can be positioned safely glass, anywhere in the aquarium.


Elos Replacement Filter Sock for All Elos Sumps
This is Elos'
new replacement filter sock for all Elos sumps. High-quality design that's easy-to-clean at a great price. 5 1/2 inches wide, 8 inches long.





150W Metal Halide Bulb - IceCap/Anthony Calfo Signature Series Double-Ended
Double-ended MH bulb offers excellent coloration and intensity. The crisp-white color will illuminate your tank nicely. Actinic su
pplementation may be used to create a bluer look. An excellent choice for nano-reefs and other reef tanks up to 18" deep. 14000K and 20000K models available.


250W Metal Halide Bulb - IceCap/Anthony Calfo Signature Series Double-Ended
Double-ended MH bulb offers excellent coloration and intensity. The crisp-white color will illuminate your tank nicely. Actinic supplementation may be used to create a bluer look. An exc
ellent choice for nano-reefs and other reef tanks up to 18" deep. 10000K, 14000K and 20000K models available.


175W Metal Halide Bulb - IceCap/Anthony Calfo Signature Series Mogul Base
This IceCap mogul base metal halide bulb offers excellent coloration and intensity. The crisp-white color will illuminate your tank nicely.
Actinic supplementation may be used to create a bluer look. An excellent choice for nano-reefs and other reef tanks up to 18" deep. 10000K, 14000K and 20000K models available.


250W Metal Halide Bulb - IceCap/Anthony Calfo Signature Series Mogul Base
This IceCap mogul base metal halide bulb offers excellent coloration and intensity. The crisp-white color will illuminate your tank nicely. Actinic supplementation may be used to create
a bluer look. An excellent choice for nano-reefs and other reef tanks up to 18" deep. 10000K, 14000K and 20000K models available.


400W Metal Halide Bulb - IceCap/Anthony Calfo Signature Series Mogul Base
This IceCap mogul base metal halide bulb offers excellent
coloration and intensity. The crisp-white color will illuminate your tank nicely. Actinic supplementation may be used to create a bluer look. An excellent choice for nano-reefs and other reef tanks up to 18" deep. 10000K, 14000K and 20000K models available.


Aquatics Photographics Seahorses and Their Relatives by Rudie H Kuiter
Revised from Seahorses, Pipefishes and their relatives, this book is by far the most comprehensive publication of the world’s Seahorses and their relatives ever produced. It has been enlarged, more than 100 pages added and includes the recently named as well as many new species. Detailed information on over 370 different species of the world, including new and recently found species. More than 1200 spectacular photographs, most of which taken in the fishes’ natural habitats. All the known living seahorses illustrated together for the first time … about 80 species.